Review: Jesus Christ Superstar at Just Off Broadway

By Kara Bauer

DISCLAIMERPlease note, one or more persons directly involved in this production are members of the staff of Backstage Baltimore. This individual or persons did not write or participate in writing this review. The only editing performed on this piece was for grammar, punctuation, and organization. No content editing (adding, changing, or omitting words) were completed without the expressed permission of the author.

(l-r) Jim Gerhardt as Judas and Luis “Matty” Montes as Jesus of Nazareth. Credit: Jason Crawford Samios-Uy

Jesus Christ Superstar, a story that is familiar to some, while at the same time refreshing and new for a younger generation continues to tell the story about Christ’s final days before his death and resurrection. It’s message about the plight of the poor and underprivileged resonates just as strongly as it did when it first premiered on Broadway in 1971. Just Off Broadway’s adaptation of Andrew Lloyd Webber’s rock musical, Directed by Jason Crawford Samios-Uy and Patrick Jay Golden, with Music Direction by Patty Delisle, and Choreography by Katie Gerstmyer, comes alive on the Baltimore stage. Despite the small space and minimalistic set design, this show packs a punch for audiences of all ages. What it lacks in appearance, it certainly more than makes up for it with its talented cast of performers. This show truly had all the components of a strong performance: Strong vocals, imaginative choreography, and powerful acting.

As soon as the lights come up, the audience is very aware of the urgency that Caiaphas mentions when speaking about the dangers that Jesus poses to their Roman traditions and ideals. Five men emerge in darkness with masks and riot gear. The familiar chord progression reverberates in the ears of the audience as a fight begins over Jesus’ presence in Rome. Audience members get to meet Judas, played by Jim Gerhardt, for the first time in this scene. As an audience member, hearing Judas sing the first vocals of the song really drew me in. Gerhardt is extremely talented; his voice and acting are mutually impeccable. On the other side of the stage, we see Jesus, played by Luis “Matty” Montes, emerge from the crowd of believers. An overwhelming sense of foreboding fills the air of the theatre– The harmonizing voices, the presence of Caiaphas and the other High Priests, along with truly haunting accompaniment by Patty DeLisle and the orchestra sets the tone for the entire show in the first few moments.

Jennifer Lutz as Mary Magdalene and Luis “Matty” Montes as Jesus of Nazareth. Credit: Jason Crawford Samios-Uy

Throughout the show, the audience has the chance to see many different kinds of choreography under the direction of Katie Gerstmyer. I applaud Gerstmyer in her foresight and structure of the choreography– it was structured enough to look uniform but freestyle enough that each ensemble member was able to create their own character choices throughout the production. For instance, in the beginning of the show, the audience can clearly see that the cast is filled with strong dancers. Even those who are not the most skilled still had space to create a character that perfectly accompanied their artistic dance choices.

Soon enough, the audience gets to meet the highlight of the show, Mary Magdalene, played by Jennifer Lutz. Lutz’s voice provides a strong and clear contrast to her male counterparts. She carries the role with poise, gusto, and so much dedication. She is constantly engaged in her craft– no matter what is happening on stage she remains engaged and dedicated to the scene. It was refreshing to see such vibrant chemistry on stage between Jesus and Mary– you can clearly tell that both actors have put in the time to create dynamic and powerful relationships with each other.

The tones of Mary’s voice fade away and are replaced by the deep, smoky tones of Christ Thomas’ interpretation of Caiaphas, the High Priest. Thomas is a truly terrifying entity on stage with his band of not-so-merry men. The entire group of High Priests (Dave Gerstmyer, Nick Ruth, Randall Noppinger, and Lee Knox) take their role seriously which only adds to the ominous mood set by music.

Josh Leach as Simon with Ensemble in the back. Credit. Jason Crawford Samios-Uy

During the song “Hosanna”, the ensemble proves its true ability as vocalists. The harmonies that they create together on stage are extremely clear and crisp in their execution. Unfortunately, I was so distracted by the strange lighting choice during the second half of that song that I was not able to focus on the music or story. I felt that this lighting choice was very out of place– the song “Hosanna” is all about Christ being willing to fight and die for his followers. Meanwhile an upbeat style lighting was occurring above the stage; the shifting blue-yellow floral lighting was too upbeat, and took me out of the scene.

A refreshing voice came from Simon, played by Josh Leach, during “Simon Zealots / Poor Jerusalem” I was forced to stop taking notes just so that I could soak up Leach’s soulful voice. His spellbinding serenade to the audience combined with the vivacious music provides a clear contrast to Jesus’ foretelling of events in the second half of the song. Being only a Senior in Mt. Hebron High School, he still has a lot of time to perfect his vocal craft. I have no doubt that this young man will develop into a performer that is even more confident, capable and talented than he is now.

Luis “Matty” Montes as Jesus of Nazareth. Credit: Jason Crawford Samios-Uy

Throughout each interaction and glance, the audience witnesses the expansion of the void which continues to widen between Jesus and Judas. Both actors add to this conflict in their own unique way, whether it be stolen glances, interactions with other characters or face to face moments– it is obvious that both Gerhardt and Montes are dedicated to the storytelling that they began.

As the show continues on, we meet Pontius Pilate, portrayed by Mike Zellhofer. He emerges from the back of the theatre and walks forward to Jesus as he contemplates his dream that foretells his interaction with a Galilean. Zellhofer has a very unique voice; both soft and contemplative, while at the same time possessing a fervor that touches the audience in an emotional way.

Jim Gerhardt as Judas. Credit: Jason Crawford Samios-Uy

The temple scene was as fitting as it was haunting, the lighting enhanced Jesus’s reaction to the tide of humanity that even he seemed powerless to redeem. While the efforts made by the cast were very convincing in this scene, I was distracted by some cast-members who interacted with stage props in a less convincing way, such as when several actors hid underneath the stairs leading up to the stage. Despite this, the audience can still feel how overwhelmed Christ is when the sick come to visit the temple, and his reaction is both moving and palpable.

There is a sense of urgency when Mary dives to catch Jesus–she sings her familiar voice as the sick clear the stage. Lutz reaches the climax of her song with gusto, confidence and poise. She reaches notes with strength–truly serenading the audience. Meanwhile, Judas’s inner conflict is displayed clearly when he goes to the high priests. Here the lighting is both effective and immersive, as is the feeling of when Judas betrays Christ–here again his emotions are palpable. His sadness is a weight that is felt clearly by the audience, and is also enhanced by the eerie yet harmonious undertones of the ensemble’s “good old Judas” as the lights dim for intermission.

Mike Zellhofer as Pilate. Credit: Jason Crawford Samios-Uy

Overall the cast is enthusiastic, and while the costuming is simple it fits the punk and rockstar vibe that characterizes the show and distinguishes it from other adaptations. The talented vocal cast lends its hand in helping to bring the audience back in following the admission by delivering a beautiful chorus that tells the story of a people who drown their sorrows and grief in gentle pools of wine.

Judas and Jesus in this scene go back and forth, vocally competing, the clash of their worldviews acting out in person Jesus begins to doubt himself in his conversation with his Father. He is clearly troubled, and brings Jesus self-doubt and hate to life. It is here that Montes really displays his vocal range to the audience, and during this troubling monologue.

Following the arrest of Jesus at the hands of the Romans, King Herod, played by Atticus Emerson, provides a welcome comic relief to the conflict at hand. His performance is spirited, humorous, and lively, fitting the style and poise of the original piece. Following Herod’s performance, “Could we start again, please?” is by far the most beautifully simplistic and minimalistic piece in the second act. The harmony of Mary and Peter (played by Jeff Baker) was thoughtfully coordinated and stunningly done.

Cast of Jesus Christ Superstar. Credit: Jason Crawford Samios-Uy

For those who know the story, we know and feel the weight of Judas’s death. I was brought to tears as Judas asks, “Does he love me too?” Judas knows what he must do, stating “My mind is in darkness now” as the music swells as the ensemble members in black lead him away, towards suicide.

The flogging of Jesus was so creative–this is a very controversial to address, let alone depict–yet Katie Gerstmyer–covered in blood, “lashes” Jesus’s back, while dancing to symbolize the whipping–truly the most intuitive way to show the 39 lashes.

Judas comes back adorned in white with angels in tow, asking “Jesus Christ, who are you what have you sacrificed?”. His reaction to his old friend’s death is simultaneously sobering yet striking, and also provides the chance for his character to stun the audience one final time with his voice.

Ensemble of Jesus Christ Superstar. Credit: Jason Crawford Samios-Uy

The final scene where Jesus is put to the cross is particularly striking, Montes’ interpretation of Jesus’s shock and desperation at his fate at the hands of the Romans is strikingly and starkly human. It is here that we see Jesus standing inside the cross, weeping in fear, set to the near-demonic tone of the audience. With the lights suddenly going out, we see Jesus taken away into oblivion, removing him from the stage, and by extension, from his connection to the living.

In summary, I’ve seen many different adaptations of Jesus Christ Superstar, but for me it is the cast that makes this show what it is; the actors are clearly passionate, the musical direction is superb, and the directors have proved their creative abilities. The show has three more performances. Be sure to catch this buzz before it’s gone.

This is what I thought of Just Off Broadway’s production of Jesus Christ Superstar… What did you think? Please feel free to leave a comment!

Jesus Christ Superstar will run through October 21 at Just Off Broadway @ Epiphany, Epiphany Lutheran Church, 4301 Raspe Avenue, Baltimore, MD 21206. For tickets email tickets@justoffbroadwaymd.com or purchase them online.

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Review: The Secret Garden at Memorial Players

By Jason Crawford Samios-Uy

Running Time: 2 hours and 30 minutes with one 15-minute intermission
Some may be privy to, but many may not know about this little gem of a theatre company in the middle of Botlon Hill called Memorial Players and it’s a company that everyone should know about. Admission is free and you get a hell of show with a packed house and community support out the wazoo! It’s heartwarming to see and enjoyable to experience and you should make time to get down and check these folks and see what community theatre is all about.
Their latest offering, The Secret Garden, with Book & Lyrics by Marsha Norman, Music by Lucy Simon, and based on the novel by Frances Hodgson Burnett, Directed by Bill Kamberger, with Music Direction by Gregory Salorie-Robinson and Tim Viets is a production worthy of the packed house it assembles just about every night.

Charlie Roberts, Gabe Viets, Ruby Webb, and Lauren Lowell. Credit: David Hornbeck


The Secret Garden, in a nutshell, tells the story of Mary Lennox, a young girl orphaned by a cholera outbreak in India when she is ten years old and she is sent to Yorkshire (The Moors) in England to live with her unhappy Uncle Archibald Craven and his curmudgeon brother, Dr. Neville Craven, as well as her seemingly sickly cousin, Collin. All the while, her late Aunt Lily Craven is never far away and watches over the household in spirit. Though they start off with a rocky relationship, Mary and Collin grow quite fond of each other and Mary discovers her aunt’s beloved but neglected “secret garden” which she, with the help of a gardener, Dickon, a chambermaid, Martha, and Collin, brings back to life. She blossoms into a happy child bringing happiness and love back into the house as well as to her cousin and uncle.

Jennifer Viets, Stephen M Deininger, and Ruby Webb. https://twitter.com/BackstageBmore


Set Design by John Seeley is simple, yet very appropriate for the space with which he is working. He cleverly uses levels to distinguish specific locations and rolling flats to change settings and it works beautifully and seamlessly. Along with a brilliant Costume Design by Rosslyn D. Kooser, one is transported to Victorian England and to this manor house and gardens.
Lighting Design by Charles Danforth, III is creative and exciting using light and shadows to insinuate the settings of each scene just enough that the audience has a better idea of where everything is taking place. The minimal projections add value to this piece and the splashes of color and specials used enhance the piece rather than hinder it and makes for smooth transitions.
I’ve got to mention that the voices in this production are AH-MA-ZING! The ensemble, as a whole, is on point and on key for every number and all are giving 100% to the score. Music Direction by Gregory Salorie-Robinson and Tim Viets knocks it out of the ballpark and this piece is well-rehearsed and well presented, musically.

Stephen M Deininger as Archibald Craven. Credit: David Hornbeck.


I wouldn’t do this production justice if I didn’t mention the absolutely outstanding orchestra for this production. This orchestra is so spot on, if one were to close one’s eyes, one would think they are listening to a polished, mastered recording of this music. This orchestra, conducted by Tim Viets, is to be commended and praised for their work on this piece. As a matter of fact, they did such a stellar job, I’d like to list them, if I may:
Keyboard I – Diana Barbour; Keyboard II – Patty DeLisle; Flute/Piccolo – Mari Hill; Oboe/English Horn – Mary Haaser; Clarinet/Bass Clarinet – David Dimmock; Trumpet – Kate Gorman; Trombone – Rob White; French Horn – Rich Roberts; Violins – Michael Vaughn and Ji Hee Cha; Violas – Hyejin Kim and Zoe Hartenbaum; Cello – Cindy Rosenberg and Najette Abouelhadi; Bass – Alec West; Percussion – Brendan Betyn; Conductor – Tim Viets
Major props all around to the orchestra of this production of The Secret Garden!
This piece is well-known and has been produced regularly since it’s Broadway run and sometimes it’s difficult to find a new and fresh way to present something so familiar but Director Bill Kamberger had a vision and it was executed marvelously. He blends the traditional with the new and presents this piece in a fresh and innovative way. He seems to really comprehend the piece and the message it sends and under his guidance, this cast tells this story and presents the message of being open to new experiences and the love of others and learning how to return it, as well. Kudos to Kamberger for a job well done.
Moving into the performance aspect of The Secret Garden, it’s worth noting that every single person involved in this performance gives his or her all. The dedication and commitment are clear and everyone looks to be having a blast up on stage, which, in turn, lets the audience to enjoy the production all the more. Though only a few are mentioned in this review, every performer in this piece is to be commended for their work and dedication.

Charlie Roberts as Dickon and Ruby Webb as Mary Lennox. Credit: David Hornbeck


Charlie Roberts takes on the role of the likable, inspiring gardener, Dickon, who helps young Mary Lennox bring the secret garden back to life. Roberts seemed to be playing this role cautiously and subdued, but he still gives a good showing. This character has a very distinct accent and Roberts does an admirable job with it, but I lost most of what he’s saying because the accent seems to be getting in the way. From the third row, it was difficult to hear him, as well, as he doesn’t project as much as I’d like and he’s using a delicate sounding voice that seems higher than his regular speaking voice for this role, which could be a directorial choice, but it somewhat hinders his performance. That being said, I’m not saying Roberts does a bad job because he certainly does not. He’s very comfortable on stage and gives a strong, physical, confident performance and seems to understand his character quite well.

Gabe Viets as Collin Craven and Ruby Webb as Mary Lennox. Credit: David Hornbeck


Ruby Webb as Mary Lennox and Gabe Viets as Collin Craven are two young actors who are going places, should they choose. Webb gives an admirable performance as they young, unhappy girl who grows to realize all is not horrible in the world and people can be good and caring and her delicate voice fits the character and music she performs. Gabe Viets is spectacular as the impertinent, spoiled Collin Craven who grows to be compassionate and loving. He gives a very authentic, natural performance that is spot on. I’m looking forward to seeing this young man in the future as he refines his craft. The two young actors have great chemistry and give delightful performances.

Stephen M Deininger as Archibald Craven and E. Lee Nicol as Dr. Neville Craven. Credit: David Hornbeck


Stephen M. Deininger as Archibald Craven and E. Lee Nicol as Dr. Neville Craven are impeccable choices for these roles and they work well with and off of each other. Deininger hits the ground running with this role. Though at points he seems a bit melodramatic and could pull back a bit, his commitment to this character and the emotion he exudes is on point. He has a strong, clear voice that resonates throughout the theatre (sanctuary) in songs such as “A Bit of Earth” and “Where in the World.” Adding to the feels this piece gives, Nicol, as Dr. Neville Craven, shows off his impeccable acting chops as he navigates through the story as a curmudgeon brother who might have done something different with his life had it not been for the choices his brother has made. Both together are a powerhouse and one of the most familiar songs, the poignant “Lily’s Eyes,” is beautifully performed by these actors both in acting and vocally.
Among this able and talented cast, a few highlights are noticeable such as Lauren Lowell as Martha, Nancy Kelso as Mrs. Medlock, and Jennifer Viets as Lily Craven.
As Mrs. Medlock, the stern, rigid housekeeper of a large house in The Moors of England, Nancy Kelso’s performance is second to none. A perfect look and top notch acting make for a natural, authentic performance where Kelso completely embodies this character. Though this character has no solo or featured vocal numbers, her performance is still strong and confident making this a character to be remembered. Kudos to Kelso on an outstanding performance in a musical without having a featured or solo number of which to speak (or sing)!

Lauren Lowell as Martha and Ruby Webb as Mary Lennox. Credit: David Hornbeck


Lauren Lowell as the chambermaid, Martha had me smiling from the moment she stepped onto the stage. The way she portrays this character just makes her likable from the get and she keeps it up throughout the production. Her lovely performances of “A Fine White Horse” and “Hold On” just make her more likeable and she has a good grasp on this character. Her accent work is pretty good, as well, making for a well-rounded, enjoyable performance.

Stephen M Deininger and Jennifer Viets. Credit: David Hornbeck


Jennifer Viets has a great look for this role and sings the hell out of it. This character doesn’t have many lines, but with a clear, booming, and superb soprano that rings throughout the theatre, she portrays a spirit of a loving wife and mother and her performance is just about flawless.
Final thought… The Secret Garden at Memorial Players is truly a production made possible by the community with so many folks lending a helping hand. This production of this classic story is full of strong, beautiful voices, able, committed actors, and a top notch orchestra making for pleasant evening of theatre that’s fit for the entire family. Whether your familiar with this piece or seeing it for the first time, you’ll walk away understanding that friendships and relationships can happen anytime, anywhere, as long as you’re open to receive and give back. It’s a well-rehearsed, well put-together production and, if that weren’t enough, it’s FREE ADMISSION so, do yourself a favor and get a seat for this show!
This is what I thought of Memorial Players’ production of The Secret Garden… What did you think? Please feel free to leave a comment!
The Secret Garden will play through May 14 at Memorial Players at Memorial Episcopal Church, 1407 Bolton Street, Baltimore, MD 21217. For more information, call 410-669-0220, ext. 13 or log on to memorialplayers.org.
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Review: MULAN JR. at Cockpit in Court

by Jason Crawford Samios-Uy

mulan jr

Running Time: 2 hours with one 15-minute intermission

It’s that time of year and school’s out for the summer! If you have little ones running around all day (yours or otherwise), you might want to consider what Cockpit in Court Summer Theatre Court Jesters Young People’s Theatre has to offer. This year, the children’s troupe of Cockpit in Court is presenting Disney’s Mulan, Jr. with Music & Lyrics by a plethora of folks including Matthew Wilder, David Zipple, Jeanine Tesori, Alexa Junge, and even Stephen Schwartz, Additional Music & Lyrics by Bryan Louiselle and Book by Patricia Cotter. This stage production is based on, of course, the 1998 Disney film Mulan, and the story of “Fa Mulan” by Robert D. San Souci. This production is brilliantly directed by Baltimore theatre veteran Liz Boyer Hunnicutt, Choreographed by Rachel Miller, with Music Direction by Patty DeLisle.

Seriously, even if you don’t have children of whom you’re responsible, you really should check out this production of Mulan, Jr. I’m an adult and not a huge fan of what one would call children’s theatre, but I have got to admit… I was thoroughly and pleasantly impressed by what these kids and production team did with this show! From the moment I walked into the theatre and saw the set, I knew I was in for something notable. Scenic Artist Laura Miller created absolutely beautiful real life backdrops of Chinese countrysides and pink blossoms that was a refreshing break from the current trend of using projections (which I think is here to stay, like it or not). Miller hand painted each backdrop and that made it all the more impressive. Actually, the set design by Diane M. Smith was perfect and beautiful but it didn’t take away from the performance but seamlessly blended in, giving the audience a very pleasant aesthetic experience.

It takes a special kind of person to direct a show with about 40 people in the cast but it takes an extra-special person to direct a show with about 40 kids (and a few teenagers) and Liz Boyer Hunnicutt, somehow or another, managed to pull it off flawlessly… I repeat… flawlessly! Hunnicutt does have experience being the resident director of another children’s theatre that shares the space so, this was old hat for her, but still, her direction was superb. As children’s theatre goes, things can get a little hokey and silly, and Mulan Jr. had it’s share of all that, but it still kept me interested because the pace of this show did not falter once. Hunnicutt’s blocking of this huge cast was fluid and she managed to get everyone on and off the stage easily and with no major mishaps. Watching this particular production and its fluidity, I can think back on a few shows I’ve been in that were comprised of mostly or all adults and could have used the help of Hunnicutt’s guidance!

Music Director Patty DeLisle is to be commened and applauded for her work in getting this cast to sound amazing! Let’s face it, working with children and teens can be difficult at times but DeLisle managed to get these kids and teens to sound great. Of course, the cast is to be commended, as well and it seems they may not have been as difficult to work with as other casts may have been, but it seems DeLisle took her time to teach these numbers and harmonies (which can be hard even with adults) and got these kids to understand what they were singing making the performance shine.

When there’s music and singing, dancing isn’t far behind and Choreographer Rachel Miller, who doubles as Mulan, the show’s namesake and main character, seemed to know her cast and what they were capable of and every single choreographed number was pulled off brilliantly and flawlessly. Each number was tight and very well rehearsed. This production even had a very brave number where a stage full of kids were dancing and swinging bamboo sticks and, though I may not have been brave enough to attempt it, the cast pulled it off without a hitch and it was a very entertaining number!

To round out the production side, Costume Design by Sharon Byrd was very appropriate and beautifully done, managing to bring together the Asian theme of the show with flowing silk (or silk-esque) robes and matching soldier outfits that all looked like it took time to conceive and execute. Kudos goes to Byrd for her work.

Now, I’ve already stated this was a show that was enjoyable and entertaining and these kids did a bang up job of bringing the story of Mulan to life, which is no small feat being it was a successful Disney film, but these kids manage to do it brilliantly!

We first meet the Ancestors, Hong (Destiny), Laozi (Honor), Lin (Loyalty), Yun (Love), and Zhang (Strength) played by Emily Ricci, Colleen Beyer, Sophie Claudio, Olivia Lockett, and Katheryn Schudel, respectively. These young ladies start this show off with a bang and set the tempo which was absolutely perfect. Each actress said her lines with confidence and with a very mature articulation that set the tone for the entire show and it was an appropriate and started the show off with a bang.

Let me take a moment to discuss comedy. Comedy, in my opinion, is much harder to pull off than drama as I’ve always found it more difficult to make someone laugh than to make someone cry and there is a certain amount of natural, raw talent to get the timing of jokes (hokey or not) and to execute them. Athena Claudio, who plays Mushu, is one of those naturally talented people who can read a joke in the script and has that perfect amount of timing and understanding to make a joke work and throw the audience into a fit of laughter. Claudio is an absolute standout in this production and I see this young lady going very far in the theatre world! She strikes me as a triple threat as she danced, sang, and acted her way throughout the show with a maturity and natural flair. When she took the lead on the song “Keep ‘Em Guessin’, this reviewer definitely took notice.

Rachel Miller, who, as stated before, took on double duty as Choreographer, was the perfect choice to play the title role of Mulan. From her first appearance, she had a strong presence and command of the stage and a clear confident voice that belted out songs such as her torch song, “Reflection.”

Charlie Holt, as Shang, Mulan’s love interest, did a fine job as the leader of the Chinese Army (it helped that he was about a head taller than the rest of the cast) and he was comfortable in his role having a strong presence on the stage.

This review wouldn’t be complete for this particular production if I didn’t mention Dylan Morrison, Jules Einhorn, and Zachary Byrd who masterfully took on the roles of Ling, Quin-Po, and Yao respectively. These three young actors were a joy to watch and their comedic timing was on point! They had the audience in stiches, especially during their own bit of cross-dressing, but you’ll have to check out the show to see how that comes about. Notably, Zachary Byrd has a talent rare for young performers in that he is able to take a joke and run with it, regardless of whether the audience is laughing with him or at him, but I’m venturing to guess the audience is laughing with him because this young man has a confidence that allows him to act a fool on stage without hesitation and that is sometimes difficult for veteran actors and makes Byrd a standout in this production.

Though the title of this show is Mulan Jr. this is indeed an ensemble piece and each and every member gives 100% to this production. From Sarah Moscoso, who played a very intimidating and hard-nosed villain, Shan Yu to Kiara Burke who brilliantly took on the role of the old, wise Emperor, the chemistry was great and I could see that everyone was having a great time, which is so very important when it comes to community theatre. I’m looking forward to seeing the work of many of these young performers in the
future!

If you don’t have kids of your own, grab your nieces or nephews, or your friend’s kids, or your neighbor’s kids and get to this show! You will not be disappointed and, who knows, you might even be opening the door for a budding performer or a budding theatre lover.

Final thought… this show is not to be missed!

This is what I thought of this production of Mulan, Jr.… what do you think?

Mulan Jr. will play July 10 at 1:00pm, July 12-14 at 11:00am, July 15 at 7:00pm, July 16 at 1:00 & 4:00pm, and July 17 at 1:00pm at CCBC, Essex Campus, Administration Building. For tickets, call 443-840-ARTS (2787) or purchase them online.